Saturday, March 29, 2014

Humayan's Tomb in Delhi


This tomb, built in 1570, is of particular cultural significance as it was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent. It inspired several major architectural innovations, culminating in the construction of the Taj Mahal.





The tomb of Humayun, second Mughal Emperor of India, was built by his widow, Biga Begum in 1569-70, 14 years after his death, at a cost of 1.5 million rupees. The tomb is in the centre of a large garden, laid out in char baah (four-fold) style, with pools joined by channels. 


The tomb and its surrounding structures are substantially in their original state, and there have been high quality restorations over the past few years funded by the Aga Khan.
The importance of Humayun's Tomb in the evolution of Mughal architecture is great. It is the first of a long series of dynastic tombs and innovative in a number of ways, notably by virtue of the fact that it introduced the garden tomb to the subcontinent. Humayun had travelled widely in the Islamic world, notably in Persia and central Asia, and brought back with him ideas that were applied by the architect of his tomb, under the direction of his widow, in this tomb.


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